John 20 – The Resurrection of Jesus & The Resurrection of Jesus

I have seen within myself what Jesus can do.  He changed my heart. 

Jesus didn’t give me wealth, or control, or special powers or anything of the sort.  Jesus gave me “LIFE” and a promise that He’s coming back.

Tomorrow we’ll close the Book of John with some more…

John 20
The Resurrection of Jesus

The use of a wreath around the Chi Rho symbolizes the victory of the Resurrection over death, and is an early visual representations of the connection between the Crucifixion of Jesus and his triumphal resurrection, as seen in the 4th century sarcophagus of Domitilla in Rome.

1 The first day of the week cometh Mary Magdalene early, when it was yet dark, unto the sepulcher, and seeth the stone taken away from the sepulcher.

2 Then she runneth, and cometh to Simon Peter, and to the other disciple, whom Jesus loved, and saith unto them, They have taken away the Lord out of the sepulcher, and we know not where they have laid him.

3 Peter therefore went forth, and that other disciple, and came to the sepulcher.

4 So they ran both together: and the other disciple did outrun Peter, and came first to the sepulcher.

5 And he stooping down, and looking in, saw the linen clothes lying; yet went he not in.

6 Then cometh Simon Peter following him, and went into the sepulcher, and seeth the linen clothes lie,

7 And the napkin, that was about his head, not lying with the linen clothes, but wrapped together in a place by itself.

8 Then went in also that other disciple, which came first to the sepulcher, and he saw, and believed.

9 For as yet they knew not the scripture that he must rise again from the dead.

10 Then the disciples went away again unto their own home.

Stained glass of Resurrection with two Marys at a Lutheran Church, South Carolina.

11 But Mary stood without at the sepulcher weeping: and as she wept, she stooped down, and looked into the sepulcher,

12 And seeth two angels in white sitting, the one at the head, and the other at the feet, where the body of Jesus had lain.

 13 And they say unto her, Woman, why weepest thou? She saith unto them, Because they have taken away my Lord, and I know not where they have laid him.

14 And when she had thus said, she turned herself back, and saw Jesus standing, and knew not that it was Jesus.

15 Jesus saith unto her, Woman, why weepest thou? whom seekest thou? She, supposing him to be the gardener, saith unto him, Sir, if thou have borne him hence, tell me where thou hast laid him, and I will take him away.

16 Jesus saith unto her, Mary. She turned herself, and saith unto him, Rabboni; which is to say, Master.

17 Jesus saith unto her, Touch me not; for I am not yet ascended to my Father: but go to my brethren, and say unto them, I ascend unto my Father, and your Father; and to my God, and your God.

“For I am not yet ascended” – the meaning appears to be that the ascension was still some time off.  Mary would have opportunity to see Jesus again, so she need not cling to Him.

Alternatively, Jesus may be reminding Mary that after His crucifixion she couldn’t have Him with her except through the Holy Ghost.

A rotunda in Church of the Holy Sepulchre, called the Anastasis (“Resurrection”), which contains the remains of a rock-cut room that Helena and Macarius identified as the burial site of Jesus.

18 Mary Magdalene came and told the disciples that she had seen the Lord, and that he had spoken these things unto her.

19 Then the same day at evening, being the first day of the week, when the doors were shut where the disciples were assembled for fear of the Jews, came Jesus and stood in the midst, and saith unto them, Peace be unto you.

20 And when he had so said, he shewed unto them his hands and his side. Then were the disciples glad, when they saw the Lord.

21 Then said Jesus to them again, Peace be unto you: as my Father hath sent me, even so send I you.

22 And when he had said this, he breathed on them, and saith unto them, Receive ye the Holy Ghost:

23 Whose soever sins ye remit, they are remitted unto them; and whose soever sins ye retain, they are retained.

Lit. “Those whose sins you forgive have already been forgiven; those whose sins you do not forgive had not been forgiven.”  God doesn’t forgive people’s sins because we do so, nor does He withhold forgiveness because we do. 

The Church of the Holy Sepulchre, also called the Basilica of the Holy Sepulchre, or the Church of the Resurrection by Eastern Christians, is a church within the Christian Quarter of the walled Old City of Jerusalem. It is a few steps away from the Muristan.

Rather, those who proclaim the gospel are in effect forgiving or not forgiving sins, depending on whether the hearers accent or reject Jesus Christ.

24 But Thomas, one of the twelve, called Didymus, was not with them when Jesus came.

25 The other disciples therefore said unto him, We have seen the Lord. But he said unto them, Except I shall see in his hands the print of the nails, and put my finger into the print of the nails, and thrust my hand into his side, I will not believe.

26 And after eight days again his disciples were within, and Thomas with them: then came Jesus, the doors being shut, and stood in the midst, and said, Peace be unto you.

27 Then saith he to Thomas, Reach hither thy finger, and behold my hands; and reach hither thy hand, and thrust it into my side: and be not faithless, but believing.

28 And Thomas answered and said unto him, My Lord and my God.

29 Jesus saith unto him, Thomas, because thou hast seen me, thou hast believed: blessed are they that have not seen, and yet have believed.

“They that have not seen, and yet have believed” – would have been very few at this time.  All whom John mentions had seen in some sense.  The words, of course, apply to future believers as well.

30 And many other signs truly did Jesus in the presence of his disciples, which are not written in this book:

31 But these are written, that ye might believe that Jesus is the Christ, the Son of God; and that believing ye might have life through his name.

The Resurrection of Jesus
Quick Explanation of
“Fear the Lord your God” (Deut 6:13)

Every day more and more people are taking a look – for some, a 2nd look – at the historical person of Jesus.

The Apostle Paul wrote that “Christ died for our sins according to the Scriptures, that he was buried, that he was raised on the third day according to the Scriptures” (1 Cor 15:3-4)

Thus the death and resurrection of Christ were proclaimed as belonging together at the very heart of the gospel, forcefully placing “the full weight of faith on both the death and resurrection of Jesus Christ” by stating, “if Christ has not been raised, our preaching is useless and so is your faith”(1 Cor 15:14)

In fact, Paul further claims that belief in the death and resurrection of Jesus is so central to salvation that “if Christ has not been raised, your faith is futile; you are still in your sins. Then those also who have fallen asleep in Christ are lost. If only for this life we have hope in Christ, we are of all people most to be pitied. [1 Cor. 15:17).

Many wonder why Jesus Christ has been studied so extensively, has been studied more than any other person?  The answer is simple, Jesus was not just a man, He is also God (Jn 1:14; 1 Tim 3:16).

When we hear the word, “God” a subliminal flag is automatically triggered and the message that enters the mind is “Fear!”

Four different types of fear:

1.Believer without a personal relationship with Jesus – fear as we understand the definition of it does not register with this person and he or she doesn’t understand why God tells us to fear Him (Deut 6:13; Prov 1:7, 8:13; Matt 10:28; etc.) because they are not afraid. 

That message “Fear” is still in their mind and because they want to do right for God they cannot help but wonder why they are not afraid.  It would be like putting a paintbrush into a can of blue paint and painting the wall, but the color on the wall is not blue.

Yet, as the believer spends more time with Jesus a personal relationship begins to form and slowly the wall starts to become blue.

2.Believer with a personal relationship with Jesus – the fear he or she has is not fear as we understand it, it is absolute awe; a complete feeling of protection that is a wonderful feeling, but also frightening.

3.Non-believer – nothing registers with them, not even the subliminal message because they are to ignorant to read.

4.The fool – this is the person that had been a believer and decided to that they preferred to be a part of the world.  They live in total fear because they know how truly powerful God is.  They are not only afraid of their own shadow, but their shadow is too.

Explaining Evidence
and Meaning of the Resurrection

Women at the empty tomb, by Fra Angelico, 1437-1446.

To begin with, everything about Jesus was unique: The prophecies of His coming. His birth. His life. His teachings. His miracles. His death. And especially His resurrection.

It is history’s most significant event.

The validity of Jesus’ claims about Himself rests on the Resurrection.

Many skeptics say that to believe in a risen Christ is nothing more than a blind leap of faith with little or no basis in truth.

When confronted with the facts, however, those who are intellectually honest have been forced to admit that the Resurrection is a historical event based on irrefutable proofs.

Evidence for the Resurrection

1.Christ predicted His resurrection.

Icon depicting the Emperor Constantine, accompanied by the bishops of the First Council of Nicaea (325), holding the Niceno–Constantinopolitan Creed of 381.

“From that time Jesus forth began Jesus to shew unto his disciples, how that he must go unto Jerusalem, and suffer many things of the elders and chief priests and scribes, and be killed, and be raised against the third day” (Matt 16:21).

Even though His followers did not understand what He was telling them at the time, they remembered His words and recorded them.

2.Jesus made numerous appearances to His followers. He comforted the mourners outside His tomb on Sunday morning. On the road to Emmaus, He explained things about Himself from the Old Testament. Later, He ate in their presence and invited them to touch Him.

Scripture records that Jesus was seen by more than 500 at one time. Some may argue that a few people could have agreed to a deception, but how can one explain the collaboration of 500 people?

3.The disciples who were once so afraid that they deserted their Lord now courageously proclaimed this news, risking their lives to preach. Their bold and courageous behavior does not make sense unless they knew with absolute certainty that Jesus had been raised from the dead.

4.The growth of the Christian church confirms the Resurrection. Peter’s first sermon, which dealt with Christ’s resurrection, stirred people to receive Him as their living Savior.

‘Then they that gladly received his word were baptized: and the same day there were added unto them about three thousand souls’ (Acts 2:41).

The Shroud of Turin is a centuries old linen cloth that bears the image of a crucified man. A man that millions believe to be Jesus of Nazareth. Is it really the cloth that wrapped his crucified body, or is it simply a medieval forgery, a hoax perpetrated by some clever artist?

Modern science has completed hundreds of thousands of hours of detailed study and intense research on the Shroud. It is, in fact, the single most studied artifact in human history, and we know more about it today than we ever have before. And yet, the controversy still rages.

And that group of believers has multiplied until now it reaches around the world. Today, there are hundreds of millions of believers, but there are more non-believers in the world.

5.The testimony of hundreds of millions of transformed lives through the centuries shows the power of the Resurrection. Many have been delivered from addictions. The destitute and despairing have found hope.

Broken marriages have been restored. The most conclusive proof for the resurrection of Jesus Christ is that He is living within believers today in all of His resurrected life and transforming power.

Conclusion

The resurrection of Jesus Christ ranks as history’s most revolutionary event.

One cannot deny that He shook the world in His day.  He was just a single man but the world feared Him to the point that they executed Him.

His life, His being, has shaped the course of history.

The Resurrection is the final proof that Jesus Christ is who He claimed to be and if He would not have died and rose for us we would have no salvation.

Only the wise “Fear God!”

…ten more quotes about Jesus.

Mark 16 – The Resurrection of Jesus & The Ending of Mark

This is the end of the Book of Mark so tomorrow we’ll being with…

Mark 16
The Resurrection of Jesus

1 And when the Sabbath was past, Mary Magdalene, and Mary the mother of James, and Salome, had bought sweet spices, that they might come and anoint him.

“Sabbath was past” – about 6:00 p.m. Saturday evening.  No purchases were possible on the Sabbath.

“Spices” – embalming wasn’t practiced by the Jews.  These spices were brought as an act of devotion and love.

“That they might come and anoint him” – the women had no expectations of Jesus’ resurrection.

2 And very early in the morning the first day of the week, they came unto the sepulcher at the rising of the sun.

3 And they said among themselves, Who shall roll us away the stone from the door of the sepulcher?

“Who shall roll us away the stone…? – setting the large stone in place was a relatively easy task, but once it had slipped into the groove cut in bedrock in front of the entrance it was very difficult to remove, as it probably weighed several hundred pounds.

4 And when they looked, they saw that the stone was rolled away: for it was very great.

5 And entering into the sepulcher, they saw a young man sitting on the right side, clothed in a long white garment; and they were affrighted.

6 And he saith unto them, Be not affrighted: Ye seek Jesus of Nazareth, which was crucified: he is risen; he is not here: behold the place where they laid him.

“He is risen” – the climax of Mark’s Gospel is the resurrection, without which Jesus’s death, though noble, would be indescribably tragic.  But in the resurrection He is declared to be the Son of God with power (Rom 1:4).

7 But go your way, tell his disciples and Peter that he goeth before you into Galilee: there shall ye see him, as he said unto you.

8 And they went out quickly, and fled from the sepulcher; for they trembled and were amazed: neither said they anything to any man; for they were afraid.

9  Now when Jesus was risen early the first day of the week, he appeared first to Mary Magdalene, out of whom he had cast seven devils.

10 And she went and told them that had been with him, as they mourned and wept.

11 And they, when they had heard that he was alive, and had been seen of her, believed not.

12 After that he appeared in another form unto two of them, as they walked, and went into the country.

16:12-13 – a shortened account of the two going to Emmaus.

13 And they went and told it unto the residue: neither believed they them.

14 Afterward he appeared unto the eleven as they sat at meat, and upbraided them with their unbelief and hardness of heart, because they believed not them which had seen him after he was risen.

“Eleven” – Judas Iscariot had committed suicide (Matt 27:5).

15 And he said unto them, Go ye into all the world, and preach the gospel to every creature.

“Go ye into all the world, and preach the gospel to every creature” – the Great Commission is found here and in all the Gospels (Matt 28:19-20; Lk 24:47-48; Jn 20:21), and in Acts 1:8.

Jesus’ final words are our “marching orders.”  They are important because apart from believing the gospel of Christ no one shall enter heaven (Jn 3:36; Rom 1:18).

16 He that believeth and is baptized shall be saved; but he that believeth not shall be damned.

“Baptized” – baptism does not save, nor is it required for salvation.  Notice that in order to be “damned” one has only not to “believe.”  Nothing is said about not being baptized.  All the believers in the book of Acts are referred to as being baptized.

17 And these signs shall follow them that believe; In my name shall they cast out devils; they shall speak with new tongues;

18 They shall take up serpents; and if they drink any deadly thing, it shall not hurt them; they shall lay hands on the sick, and they shall recover.

19 So then after the Lord had spoken unto them, he was received up into heaven, and sat on the right hand of God.

20 And they went forth, and preached everywhere, the Lord working with them, and confirming the word with signs following. Amen.

The Ending of Mark

There are several different endings to the Gospel of Mark found in the various Greek manuscripts.

Codex Bezae facsimile page of Mark 16:6-15.

Most Greek texts and several ancient translations conclude with the ending familiar to us as Mark 16:9-20. The earnest Greek manuscript with that ending is from the 5th century, but evidence from the church fathers suggests that it was already in existence during the 2nd century.

Many scholars feel, however, that the vocabulary and themes of the traditional ending are inconsistent with the rest of the Gospel.

In the two oldest Greek manuscripts and in a number of ancient versions, Mark’s Gospel ends at 16:8.

Clement of Alexandria and Origen show no knowledge of any ending of this Gospel account beyond verse 8, and Eusebius and Jerome affirm that nearly all Greek manuscripts known to them were concluded with this verse.

Most scholars believe that this is indeed the point at which the original Gospel probably ended and suggest that the other endings very likely developed during the 2nd century, after the Gospel of Mark was read alongside the other Gospels and appeared, by comparison, to lack a satisfactory conclusion.

Original Ending of Mark Found! (sort of)

Despite its abruptness, Mark 16:8 is arguably an appropriate ending for the Gospel, since one of its motifs is the fear caused by God’s powerful work in and through Jesus (see, e.g., 5:15,33; 9:6).

The women’s fear suggests that God had performed one more climactic, powerful work, confirming the testimony of the empty tomb and the angelic announcement that Jesus had indeed arisen from the dead, just as he had promised (8:31; 9:9,31; 10:34).

…the Book of Luke.

Matthew 28 – The Resurrection of Jesus & The Soldiers Guarding Jesus’ Tomb

This is the last chapter of the Book of Matthews.  Tomorrow we’ll look at…

Matthew 28
The Resurrection of Jesus

Entrance to the Garden Tomb of Jesus. The photographer wrote, “The so-called ‘Garden Tomb’. This tomb was first proposed in the 19th century as the site of Jesus’ burial, in part as an alternative to the Church of the Holy Sepulchre. Unfortunately, it is very doubtful that this was actually Jesus’ tomb. Not only was there no ancient tradition associated with this location, but the tomb is not of the correct age. It was originally an ancient Israelite tomb and seems to have gone out of use during the time of Jesus. Hence it was not re-shaped in the distinct ‘niche’ or ‘kokkhim’ pattern of Second Temple Jewish burials. The tomb was then only re-used in the Byzantine period. Nevertheless, a dedicated Protestant group maintains a beautiful garden around the tomb and many (Protestants in particular) find the site more condusive to prayerful reflection than the busy and ornate Church of the Holy Sepulchre.”
Entrance to the Garden Tomb of Jesus?
The photographer wrote, “The so-called ‘Garden Tomb’.

This tomb was first proposed in the 19th century as the site of Jesus’ burial, in part as an alternative to the Church of the Holy Sepulchre.

Unfortunately, it is very doubtful that this was actually Jesus’ tomb.

Not only was there no ancient tradition associated with this location, but the tomb is not of the correct age.

It was originally an ancient Israelite tomb and seems to have gone out of use during the time of Jesus.

Hence it was not re-shaped in the distinct ‘niche’ or ‘kokkhim’ pattern of Second Temple Jewish burials.

The tomb was then only re-used in the Byzantine period.

Nevertheless, a dedicated Protestant group maintains a beautiful garden around the tomb and many (Protestants in particular) find the site more condusive to prayerful reflection than the busy and ornate Church of the Holy Sepulchre.”

1 In the end of the Sabbath, as it began to dawn toward the first day of the week, came Mary Magdalene and the other Mary to see the sepulcher.

“First day of the week” – Sunday began by Jewish time at sundown on Saturday.  Spices could then be bought and they were ready to set out early the next day.  When the women started out, it was dark, and by the time they arrived at the tomb it was still early dawn.

“The other Mary” – the wife of Clopas.

2 And, behold, there was a great earthquake: for the angel of the Lord descended from heaven, and came and rolled back the stone from the door, and sat upon it.

“A great earthquake” – only Matthew mentioned this earthquake and the one at Jesus’s death.  It is also clear from the parallel accounts that the events of vv. 2-4 occurred before the women actually arrived at the tomb.

3 His countenance was like lightning, and his raiment white as snow:

4 And for fear of him the keepers did shake, and became as dead men.

5 And the angel answered and said unto the women, Fear not ye: for I know that ye seek Jesus, which was crucified.

6 He is not here: for he is risen, as he said. Come, see the place where the Lord lay.

7 And go quickly, and tell his disciples that he is risen from the dead; and, behold, he goeth before you into Galilee; there shall ye see him: lo, I have told you.

8 And they departed quickly from the sepulcher with fear and great joy; and did run to bring his disciples word.

9 And as they went to tell his disciples, behold, Jesus met them, saying, All hail. And they came and held him by the feet, and worshipped him.

10 Then said Jesus unto them, Be not afraid: go tell my brethren that they go into Galilee, and there shall they see me.

The Holy Face of Jesus is based off of the Shroud of Turin.
The Holy Face of Jesus is based off of the Shroud of Turin.

11 Now when they were going, behold, some of the watch came into the city, and shewed unto the chief priests all the things that were done.

28:11-15 – only Mathew tells of the posting of the guard and he follows up by telling of their report.

12 And when they were assembled with the elders, and had taken counsel, they gave large money unto the soldiers,

13 Saying, Say ye, His disciples came by night, and stole him away while we slept.

14 And if this comes to the governor’s ears, we will persuade him, and secure you.

15 So they took the money, and did as they were taught: and this saying is commonly reported among the Jews until this day.

16 Then the eleven disciples went away into Galilee, into a mountain where Jesus had appointed them.

Tomb of the Virgin Mary, Jerusalem.
Tomb of the Virgin Mary, Jerusalem.

“Eleven” – remember Judas had committed suicide on 27:5.

17 And when they saw him, they worshipped him: but some doubted.

18 And Jesus came and spake unto them, saying, All power is given unto me in heaven and in earth.

19 Go ye therefore, and teach all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost:

“Baptizing” – a sign of their union with and commitment to Christ, that is all baptism means.  It won’t save you, nor do you need to be baptized to be saved.

The photographer wrote, “The Baptism Site on the Jordan side of the Jordan River is one of the most important recent discoveries in biblical archaeology. Excavations only began here in 1996, following Jordan’s peace treaty with Israel in 1994, but have already uncovered more than 20 churches, caves and baptismal pools dating from the Roman and Byzantine periods. Although the identification is not absolutely certain, archaeology has shown that the area known as Wadi Kharrar has long been believed to be the biblical Bethany-beyond-the-Jordan, where John the Baptist lived and Jesus was baptized. This area is also associated with the ascension of the Prophet Elijah into heaven.”
The photographer wrote, “The Baptism Site on the Jordan side of the Jordan River is one of the most important recent discoveries in biblical archaeology.

Excavations only began here in 1996, following Jordan’s peace treaty with Israel in 1994, but have already uncovered more than 20 churches, caves and baptismal pools dating from the Roman and Byzantine periods.

20 Teaching them to observe all things whatsoever I have commanded you: and, lo, I am with you alway, even unto the end of the world. Amen.

Jesus is not dead:

“I am he that liveth, and was dead; and behold, I am alive forevermore, Amen; and I have the keys of hell and of death” (Rev 1:18).

The Soldiers
Guarding Jesus’ Tomb

Tomb of Jesus Several places have been proposed as the tomb of Jesus, the place where Jesus Christ was buried: * Church of the Holy Sepulchre, Jerusalem, accepted by many Christians and scholars as built on ground on which Jesus was crucified and buried * Garden Tomb, discovered in the 19th century outside of the old city of Jerusalem, considered a possible site of Jesus's tomb by many Protestant scholars and pilgrims * Roza Bal in Srinagar, India, a shrine venerated by locals and Ahmadiyya Muslims as the grave of a sage named Yuz Asaf, or "son of Joseph" * Talpiot Tomb, rock-cut tomb in the East Talpiot neighborhood, five kilometers south of the Old City in East Jerusalem * Tomb of Jesus in Shingō, Japan, where, according to legend, Jesus died, aged 106, after he escaped the crucifixion in Jerusalem
Tomb of Jesus
Several places have been proposed as the tomb of Jesus, the place where Jesus Christ was buried:
* Church of the Holy Sepulchre, Jerusalem, accepted by many Christians and scholars as built on ground on which Jesus was crucified and buried

* Garden Tomb, discovered in the 19th century outside of the old city of Jerusalem, considered a possible site of Jesus’s tomb by many Protestant scholars and pilgrims
* Roza Bal in Srinagar, India, a shrine venerated by locals and Ahmadiyya Muslims as the grave of a sage named Yuz Asaf, or “son of Joseph”

* Talpiot Tomb, rock-cut tomb in the East Talpiot neighborhood, five kilometers south of the Old City in East Jerusalem

* Tomb of Jesus in Shingō, Japan, where, according to legend, Jesus died, aged 106, after he escaped the crucifixion in Jerusalem

Only Matthew mentions that soldiers guarded the tomb of Jesus. Mt 27:62-66 records that the chief priests and Pharisees recalled Jesus’ own prediction that he would rise again, and they cited their fear that the disciples might steal his body to support their request for an authorized guard.

Pilate’s reply in 27:65 literally means “You have a guard,” and on this basis some have surmised that the guard in question was the temple guard under the high priest’s own jurisdiction.

However, the language of 28:14 precludes this possibility and requires a Roman guard under Pilate’s direct control. Moreover, it is unclear why the chief priests and Pharisees would have requested permission for a guard that they themselves could have directed.

The tomb of Jesus was already sealed by a large stone, which was then probably affixed with an official seal that, if broken, would have attested to the opening of the tomb.

Matthew 28:11-15 records that some of the guards reported the things they had seen and were bribed into circulating a false report about their own negligence and the theft of Jesus’ body. The ensuing rumor is assumed in Jn 20:2,15 and appears later in Justin Martyr’s 2nd century Dialogue With Trypho (108:2).

The Roman concern for safeguarding tombs is reflected in an imperial inscription bearing the title Diatagma Kaisaros, acquired at Nazareth during the 19th century.

The marble slab containing 21 lines of Greek text, dates from between 50 B.C. and 50 A.D. The text attests to the sanctity of tombs and threatens with capital punishment any who would defile a tomb by removing the body.

Gethsemane “is a garden at the foot of the Mount of Olives in Jerusalem most famous as the place where, according to the gospels, Jesus and his disciples are said to have prayed the night. The photographer asked, “2,000 years old olive tree… is it possible?”
Gethsemane “is a garden at the foot of the Mount of Olives in Jerusalem most famous as the place where, according to the gospels, Jesus and his disciples are said to have prayed the night.

The photographer asked, “2,000 years old olive tree… is it possible?”

Scholars have considered the possibility that, in light of the disturbances between Jesus and early Christians over what happened to the body of Jesus, the Diatagma Kaisaros may reflect an early Roman response.

Although the present state of research does not allow for absolute certainty, the presence of this authentic decree lends historical credibility to Matthew’s account.

And if you walk with Him He will be there with you always.

Tomorrow we’ll start with the Book of Mark.