Book of Micah

His reign commenced as a coregency with his father, which lasted for 11 years. Because his father Uzziah was afflicted with tzaraas after he entered the Temple to burn incense, Jotham became governor of the palace and the land at that time, i.e., coregent, while his father lived in a separate house as a leper.

His reign commenced as a coregency with his father, which lasted for 11 years. Because his father Uzziah was afflicted with tzaraas after he entered the Temple to burn incense, Jotham became governor of the palace and the land at that time, i.e., coregent, while his father lived in a separate house as a leper.

According to a British survey, an average citizen of the United Kingdom knowingly violates five rules a week which amounts to 260 rules a year, or 16,250 in a lifetime.  These range from jaywalking to littering to piggybacking on some else’s wireless service.

Of course, with millions of laws on the books, it’s hard for any of us to make it through a week without some kind of infraction.

It was a needed message in Micah’s time. Micah prophesied during the reigns of Jotham, Ahaz, and Hezekiah. These were days of inequality and idolatry.

Hezekiah was the best of these kings, but even his reforms had only a temporary effect.

Micah preached about both judgment and hope. Israel’s sins could not be overlooked, but neither could the promises of God.

Which included the prophecy of the Messiah being born in the little town of Bethlehem, the Ruler whose goings forth were from old, into everlasting.

Ahaz was king of Judah, and the son of successor of Jotham.
Ahaz was 20 when he became king of Judah and reigned for 16 years. Immediately upon his accession Ahaz had to meet a coalition formed by Northern Israel, uner Pekah, and Damascus (Syria), under Rezin.
These kings wished to compel him to join them in opposing the Assyrians, who were arming the force against the Northern Kingdom under Tiglath-Pileser III (Pul). To protect himself Ahaz called in the aid of the Assyrians.
Sin devastates; but we have the promise of Jesus.
Key Verse:
“He hath shewed thee, O man, what is good; and what doth the Lord require of thee, but to do justly, and to love mercy, and to walk humbly with thy God?” (Micah 6:8).
Key Action:
We need to live justly, loving mercy, and walking humbly with God.

Sometimes we make the Christian life into something it’s not, placing ourselves under arbitrary, self-imposed rules, long lists of do’s and don’ts, restrictive disciplines, and complicated objectives.

The prophet Micah, however, boils it all down by asking, “What does the LORD require?”

He requires us to do things justly, love mercy, and walk humbly with Him.

Key Thought:

Sin devastates; but we have the promise of Jesus.

Key Verse:

“He hath shewed thee, O man, what is good; and what doth the Lord require of thee, but to do justly, and to love mercy, and to walk humbly with thy God?” (Micah 6:8).

Key Action:

We need to live justly, loving mercy, and walking humbly with God.

 

 

Posted in Books of the Bible, Accordion.