The Time Between the Testaments: War (Part 1 of 2)

April 22, 2014

The words in Black and Maroon is the text from historical/archaeological facts or the numbered scriptures from the Bible.  
Words in Blue are God - Red is Jesus – Green is Jerry.
Jerry is not a scholar, but a very curious 12 year old boy who loves Jesus and likes to research.
If you have any questions you would like to be answered privately or any subject you would like posted please contact me here.

The World in Two Minutes

This video is interesting to watch, but it has nothing to do with the Bible (Click the title above).

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740-1The Time Between the Testaments
(Part 1 of 2)

We would not say that a knowledge of the period between the Old and New Testaments is vital to one’s understanding of the four Gospels, but it is very desirable, and indeed quite necessary if we would fully appreciate many of the scenes and incidents on which Matthew lifts the curtain.

Jesus had said: “...Thou shalt love the Lord thy God with all thy heart, and with all thy soul, and with all thy mind. This is the first and great commandment. And the second is like unto it, Thou shalt love thy neighbour as thyself. On these two commandments hang all the law and the prophets (Matt 22:37-40). By reading “Pilgrim’s Progress” by Paul Bunyan you will understand exactly what Jesus meant and a gift of the Holy Ghost will walk you through it. Get it at: Buy it at Barnes & Noble for $4.49 http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/pilgrims-progress-in-modern-english-john-bunyan/1100929469  or Buy it at Amazon.com for $14.95 http://www.amazon.com/Pilgrims-Progress-English-Classic-Classics/dp/0882707574/ref=sr_1_6_title_1_pap?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1385848489&sr=1-6&keywords=pilgrim%27s+progress or If you have a Kindle get it for $7.69 http://www.amazon.com/Pilgrims-Progress-Mdrn-John-Bunyan-ebook/dp/B004X6SX10/ref=sr_1_7?ie=UTF8&qid=1385849855&sr=8-7&keywords=pilgrim%27s+progress or for Free http://www.amazon.com/Pilgrims-Progress-John-Bunyan-ebook/dp/B00AQMEV8E/ref=sr_1_1?s=digital-text&ie=UTF8&qid=1385847971&sr=1-1&keywords=pilgrim%27s+progress+kindle+free or If you want to download it to your computer in a Different Format. http://manybooks.net/titles/bunyanjoetext94plgrm11.html

Jesus had said:
…Thou shalt love the Lord thy God with all thy heart, and with all thy soul, and with all thy mind.
This is the first and great commandment.
And the second is like unto it, Thou shalt love thy neighbour as thyself.
On these two commandments hang all the law and the prophets (Matt 22:37-40).
By reading “Pilgrim’s Progress” by Paul Bunyan you will understand exactly what Jesus meant and the Holy Ghost will walk you through it.
Get it at:
Barnes & Noble for $4.49 or
Amazon.com for $14.95  or
A Kindle for $7.69 or for Free  or If you want to download it in a Different Format. 

It gives a background against which we see with clearness the connections and relevance of the sayings and doing which occupy the earlier pages of our New Testament.  The primary goal for everyone should be to understand and please God, there is nothing greater than that.

Part one briefly covers the wars, ending with the Roman Empire and Part two is the religious and spiritual development.

The Period in General

With the Old Testament canon closing with Malachi at about 397 B.C., we see that this period between Malachi and Matthew covers some 400 years.

This 400 year interval has been called “the dark period” of Israel’s history in pre-Christian times, because during it there was neither prophet nor inspired writer.

With this period we seem to find the sad fulfillment of Psalm 74:9 upon Israel:

We see not our signs; there is no more any prophet; neither is there among us any that knoweth how long. 

The condition of the Jews as a nation and race at the beginning of this 40 year period should be kept in mind. Two hundred years earlier Jerusalem had been overthrown and the Jewish people carried into the Babylonian exile (606-586 B.C.) as punishment for their unfaithfulness to God.

At the end of this 70 year punishment period, the Babylonian empire having been overthrown and succeeded by that of Media-Persia (536 B.C.), Cyrus, the Persian emperor, issued a decree permitting the return of the Jews to Israel. Under the leadership of Zerubbabel, some 5,000 Jews returned.

Some 20 years after their return, after many setbacks, the building of the Temple was completed in 516 B.C. Then after another 58 years had passed, in 458 B.C., Ezra the scribe returned to Jerusalem with a small group of Israelites and restored the Law and the ritual.

Still another 13 years later, in 445 B.C., Nehemiah had come to Jerusalem to rebuild the walls and become governor. Now, once again, there was a Jewish state in Judea, though of course under Persian rule.

Such, then is the picture of the Jewish people at the beginning of the 400 year period between Malachi and Matthew:

The Jewish Remnant back in Judea for about 140 years (536-397 B.C.);

A small, dependent Jewish state there;

Jerusalem and the temple rebuilt;

The Law and the ritual restored; but

With the mass of the people remaining dispersed through-out the Media-Persian empire.

The Political Development

Now, if we are to appreciate this Jewish community as it re-emerges in the pages of the New Testament, we need look at their political development as well as their religious development.

This map reveals the expansion of the Persian Empire from Cyrus the Great to Darius I, 550-486 BC. The Persian Achaemenid Empire was actually the last great empire of the ancient Near East. Its boundaries extended from the Aegean Sea in the west to the Indus River in the east, such a large empire was created in just a little over 10 years by Cyrus II the Great.

This map reveals the expansion of the Persian Empire from Cyrus the Great to Darius I, 550-486 BC. The Persian Achaemenid Empire was actually the last great empire of the ancient Near East. Its boundaries extended from the Aegean Sea in the west to the Indus River in the east, such a large empire was created in just a little over 10 years by Cyrus II the Great.

Viewed politically, the varying course of the Jewish nation in Palestine simple reflects the history of the different world-empires which ruled Palestine. The one exception to this was the Maccabean revolt, which resulted for a short period of time in there being an independent Jewish government.

Jewish history during those 400 centuries between the Testaments runs in six periods:

The Persian,

The Greek,

The Egyptian,

The Syrian,

The Maccabean and

The Roman.

The Persian Period (536-333 B.C.)

The Persian rule over Palestine, which commenced with the decree of Cyrus in 536 B.C. for the return of the Jewish Remnant, continued until 333 B.C., when Palestine fell under the power of Alexander the Great (the third of the Gentile world-empires foretold by Daniel).

Walls During the Graeco-Persian War in the 5th century BC, King Xerxes (520-465 BC) invaded Greece in 481 BC with hundreds of thousands of infantry soldiers and an enormous naval fleet. The Persians ultimately lost. One of the most famous battles during the subsequent war was between Xerxes’s army and the Greeks at Thermopylae in 480 B.C.

During the Graeco-Persian War in the 5th century BC, King Xerxes (520-465 BC) invaded Greece in 481 BC with hundreds of thousands of infantry soldiers and an enormous naval fleet. The Persians ultimately lost. One of the most famous battles during the subsequent war was between Xerxes’s army and the Greeks at Thermopylae in 480 B.C.

This means that at the end of the Book of Malachi the Jews were still under Persian rule, and remained so for about the first 60 years of the inter-Testament period.

Persian rule seems to have been tolerant. The high priest form of Jewish government was respected with the high priest being given an increasing degree of civil power in addition to his religious offices, though of course he was responsible to the Persian governor of Syria.

The Greek Period (333-323 B.C.)

Alexander the Great is a phenomenon in history. Catapulted into leadership through the assassination of his father when he, Alexander, was but twenty years of age, he transformed the face of the world, politically, in little more than a decade.

He is the “notable horn” in the “he-goat” vision of Daniel (Dan 8:1-7).

In his march on Jerusalem, he not only spared the city, but also offered sacrifice to Jehovah and had the prophecies of Daniel read to him concerning the overthrow of the Persian empire by a king of Grecia, (Dan 8:21.)

Thereafter he treated the Jews with respect and gave them full rights of citizenship with the Greeks in his new city, Alexandria, and in other cities.

Josephus, the late first century Jewish historian, records the visit of Alexander the Great to the city of Jerusalem in the 4th century B.C. He recounts how Alexander “went up into the temple” and “offered sacrifice to God.” He says that the Book of Daniel was shown to Alexander. Alexander assumed, as have many commentators since that time, that Daniel was prophesying of Alexander.

Josephus, the late first century Jewish historian, records the visit of Alexander the Great to the city of Jerusalem in the 4th century B.C. He recounts how Alexander “went up into the temple” and “offered sacrifice to God.” He says that the Book of Daniel was shown to Alexander. Alexander assumed, as have many commentators since that time, that Daniel was prophesying of Alexander.

This in return, created decidedly pro-Greek sympathies among the Jews, and, along with Alexander’s spreading of the Greek language and civilization, a Hellenistic spirit developed among the Jews which greatly affected their mental outlook afterward.

The Egyptian Period
(323-204 B.C.)

This is the longest of the six periods of the inter-Testament period. The death of Alexander resulted in a period of time of confusion which was resolved by a four-fold break-up of Alexander’s empire under four generals: Ptolemy, Lysimachus, Cassander and Selenus.

These are the four “notable ones” which take the place of the “great horn,” as predicted in Dan 8:21-22.

After severe fighting, Judea, along with the rest of Syria fell to Ptolemy Soter, the first of the Greek kings to rule over Egypt. The beginning of the Ptolematic Dynasty.

For a time Ptolemy Soter dealt harshly with the Jews, but afterwards became just as friendly. His successor, Ptolemy Philadelphus, continued this favorable attitude. His reign is notable in that the famous Septuagint (Greek language) translation of the Old Testament Scriptures was made from the Hebrew onto the Greek language.

We see the importance of this when we realize that the Greek language had now become the language of the civilized world. The Jews were so numerous in Egypt and North Africa that such a translation had become a necessity.

The Septuagint came into general use well before the birth of Jesus and was still in use during the time Jesus was on earth and was quoted by Jesus.

The Syrian Period (204-165 B.C.)

When Ptolemy Philopater (fourth Ptolemy) died, his successor, Ptolemy Epiphanies, was only five years old. Antiochus the Great seized his opportunity and in 204 B.C. invaded Egypt. Judea, with other territories, soon after became annexed to Syria and so passed under the rule of the Seleucidae

Ptolomy Soter, King of Egypt: Boyhood friend of Alexander the Great, whom he later served as such a devoted bodyguard that he even kidnapped Alexander's body en route to Macedonia. He diverted it to Alexandria, the first of Alexander's many eponymous city foundations, to make the tomb become the focus of the Ptolemaic ruler cult he established in Egypt.

Ptolomy Soter, King of Egypt:
Boyhood friend of Alexander the Great, whom he later served as such a devoted bodyguard that he even kidnapped Alexander’s body en route to Macedonia. He diverted it to Alexandria, the first of Alexander’s many eponymous city foundations, to make the tomb become the focus of the Ptolemaic ruler cult he established in Egypt.

There are two points of special note about this period. First, it was at this time that Palestine was divided into the five sections which we find in the New Testament. (Sometimes the first three of these collectively are called Judea.) These different provinces are:

Judea,

Samaria,

Galilee,

Perea,

Trachonitis.

Secondly, this Syrian period was the most tragic part of the inter-Testament era for the Jews of Judea. Antiochus the Great was harsh toward the Jews. So was his successor.

Yet the Jews in Judea were still permitted to live under their own laws, administered by the high priest and his council. But with the accession of Antiochus Epiphanies (175-164 B.C.) a “reign of terror” fell upon the Jews.

In 170 B.C. Jerusalem was plundered, the wall torn down, the temple desecrated, temple sacrifices were abolished, the Holy of Holies was stripped of its costly furniture, Jewish religion was banned, a pig was sacrificed on the altar and the Temple at Jerusalem was rededicated to Jupiter Olympus with a statue of Jupiter Olympus erected on the altar and the people were subjected to monstrous cruelties.

The Maccabean Period (165-63 B.C.)

This excessiveness by Antiochus provoked the Jews to revolt and resist.

Judas, known as Judas (Hebrew word for hammer), gathered around him a large army of guerilla fighters and after several victories assumed the offensive.

A representative from Antiochus IV called upon Mattathias to make the pagan sacrifice, but he refused. When another of his townsmen stepped forward to do it, the aged priest struck him down. He also killed the king's messenger and began to lead a revolution. Mattathias died in 166 BC, and his son Judah, nicknamed Maccabeus (the hammer), took his place. He lead a war against the Syrian Greeks. In spite of overwhelming odds the Jewish people gained an improbable victory. The temple was regained in 165 B.C. and rededicated.

A representative from Antiochus IV called upon Mattathias to make the pagan sacrifice, but he refused. When another of his townsmen stepped forward to do it, the aged priest struck him down. He also killed the king’s messenger and began to lead a revolution. Mattathias died in 166 BC, and his son Judah, nicknamed Maccabeus (the hammer), took his place. He lead a war against the Syrian Greeks. In spite of overwhelming odds the Jewish people gained an improbable victory. The temple was regained in 165 B.C. and rededicated.

Jerusalem was captured, the temple refurnished, and on 25th December, the anniversary of its being polluted three years earlier, the orthodox sacrifices were reinstituted (which date the Jews still observed as the Feast of the Dedication: see Jn 10:22).

Judas Maccabeus also captured the chief posts up and down the land.

Antiochus contemplated revenge against Judas, but a defeat in Persia, in addition to the successive defeats in Judea seemed to have brought upon him a superstitious dread which developed into a fatal sickness. He is said to have died in a state of raving madness.

What seems a deliverance, proved to be the deadliest crisis to come. Antiochus’s son was very young. Lysias was the self-appointed Syrian regent. He now invades Judea with an army of 120,000 and defeats Judas and his army at Bethsura. 

Judas and his men retreat to Jerusalem which is placed under siege. But just when it seemed hopeless because of a rival regent at the Syrian capital, Lysias suddenly persuaded the young son of Antiochus to make peace with Judea – promising them the restoration of all their religious liberties. Thus the Maccabean revolt was crowned with success.

Further troubles arose later, however, from a new successor on the Syrian throne, Demetrius. During this period Judas Maccabeus was killed.

In 143 B.C. Simon, the brother of Judas assumed leadership of the army. He was able to capture all other Syrian strongholds in Judea and forced the Syrian garrison in the citadel at Jerusalem to surrender.

Thus Judea was freed of all alien troops; and from that time (about 142 B.C.) was once again under independent Jewish government. Except for one short lapse, this continued until Judea became a Roman province, in 63 B.C.

The Roman Period (63 B.C. onward)

The Herod family now appears on the scene. Antipater, the father of the Herod who reigned at the time of our Lord’s birth, managed to secure the support of Roman general Pompey to gain control of Judea.

Herod, 73/74 B.C. – 4 B.C., also known as Herod the Great and Herod I, was a Roman client king of Judea.  He has been described as "a madman who murdered his own family and a great many rabbis", "the evil genius of the Judean nation", "prepared to commit any crime in order to gratify his unbounded ambition" and "the greatest builder in Jewish history".  He is known for his colossal building projects throughout Judea, including his expansion of the Second Temple in Jerusalem (Herod's Temple), the construction of the port at Caesarea Maritima, the fortress at Masada and Herodium. Vital details of his life are recorded in the works of the 1st century C.E. Roman–Jewish historian Josephus. Upon Herod's death, the Romans divided his kingdom among three of his sons—Archelaus became ethnarch of the tetrarchy of Judea, Herod Antipas became tetrarch of Galilee and Peraea, and Philip became tetrarch of territories east of the Jordan. Matthew’s Gospel tells us that when King Herod learned about the birth of the Messiah, he tried to trick the wise men into serving as spies to help him murder Jesus. When that didn’t work, he killed all the male children in Bethlehem under two years old in a murderous effort to exterminate God’s anointed one (Matt 2:16).

Herod, 73/74 B.C. – 4 B.C., also known as Herod the Great and Herod I, was a Roman client king of Judea.
He has been described as “a madman who murdered his own family and a great many rabbis”, “the evil genius of the Judean nation”, “prepared to commit any crime in order to gratify his unbounded ambition” and “the greatest builder in Jewish history”.
He is known for his colossal building projects throughout Judea, including his expansion of the Second Temple in Jerusalem (Herod’s Temple), the construction of the port at Caesarea Maritima, the fortress at Masada and Herodium. Vital details of his life are recorded in the works of the 1st century C.E. Roman–Jewish historian Josephus.
Upon Herod’s death, the Romans divided his kingdom among three of his sons—Archelaus became ethnarch of the tetrarchy of Judea, Herod Antipas became tetrarch of Galilee and Peraea, and Philip became tetrarch of territories east of the Jordan.
Matthew’s Gospel tells us that when King Herod learned about the birth of the Messiah, he tried to trick the wise men into serving as spies to help him murder Jesus. When that didn’t work, he killed all the male children in Bethlehem under two years old in a murderous effort to exterminate God’s anointed one (Matt 2:16).

The result was a siege of Jerusalem which lasted three months with Pompey taking the city. Pompey with disregard for the Temple strolled into the Holy of Holies – an action which at once estranged all loyal Jewish hearts toward the Roman. That was 63 B.C.

Pompey’s subjugation of Jerusalem ended the period of Judea’s regained independence. Judea now became a province of the Roman empire. The high priest was completely deprived of any royal status, and retained priestly function only.

The governing power was exercised by Antipater, who was appointed procurator of Judea by Julius Cesar in 47 B.C.

Antipater appointed Herod (his own son by marriage with Cypros, and Abrabian women) as governor of Galilee, when Herod was only fifteen years old. In about 40 B.C., after appealing to Rome, Herod was appointed king of the Jews.

Herod seeking to ingratiate himself with the Jews married Marianne, the granddaughter of a former high priest, and by making her brother Aristobulus high priest. He also greatly increased the splendor of Jerusalem, building the elaborate temple which was the center of Jewish worship in the time of our Lord.

However, he was as cruel and sinister as he was able and ambitious. He stained his hands with many murders. He slew all three of his wife’s brothers – Antigonus, Aristobulus and Hyrcanus.

Later he murdered even his wife. Again, later, he murdered his mother-in-law. And still later he murdered his own sons by Marianne. This is that “Herod the Great” who was king when our Lord was born.

Such then, in brief, is the political history of the Jews in Palestine during the 400 year period between Malachi and Matthew. 

The Roman Empire is in full control during the time of the New Testament which will be viewed, but tomorrow we will look at the religious and spiritual development prior to the birth of our Lord.


Marriage and Divorce in Ancient Israel and Malachi 4 – The Coming Day of the Lord

April 21, 2014

The words in Black and Maroon is the text from historical/archaeological facts or the numbered scriptures from the Bible.  
Words in Blue are God - Red is Jesus – Green is Jerry.
Jerry is not a scholar, but a very curious 12 year old boy who loves Jesus and likes to research.
If you have any questions you would like to be answered privately or any subject you would like posted please contact me here.

Marriage and Divorce
in Ancient Israel

At the heart of the Hebrew concept of marriage is the notion of covenant—a legally binding agreement with spiritual and emotional ramifications (Prov 2:17). God serves as witness to the marriage covenant, blessing its faithfulness but hating its betrayal (Mal 2:14-16).

 Ramses II and his wife Marriage was regarded as alliance between families, a joining of clans and union of property. Couples became married when they decided to live together. There was nor civil or religious ceremony. Prenuptial agreements were routinely signed to protect property. Some scholars believe that the wedding ring dates back to ancient Egypt. The finger ring was first used by the Egyptians around 2800 B.C. Some scholars believed that it may have symbolized marriage since the Egyptians viewed married as something that lasted an eternity and a circle or ring had no end. Rings of gold were prized by Egyptian nobility. Egyptian exchanged sandals when they exchanged property or authority. A sandal was given to a groom by the father of the bride. Some believe the word "honeymoon" comes from the ancient Egyptian custom of kidnaping the bride and holding her captive a moon (a month) and drinking a honey-sweetened drink during that time.

Ramses II and his wife Marriage was regarded as alliance between families, a joining of clans and union of property. Couples became married when they decided to live together. There was nor civil or religious ceremony. Prenuptial agreements were routinely signed to protect property.
Some scholars believe that the wedding ring dates back to ancient Egypt. The finger ring was first used by the Egyptians around 2800 B.C. Some scholars believed that it may have symbolized marriage since the Egyptians viewed married as something that lasted an eternity and a circle or ring had no end. Rings of gold were prized by Egyptian nobility.
Egyptian exchanged sandals when they exchanged property or authority. A sandal was given to a groom by the father of the bride.
Some believe the word “honeymoon” comes from the ancient Egyptian custom of kidnaping the bride and holding her captive a moon (a month) and drinking a honey-sweetened drink during that time.

The Lord’s intimate involvement renders this legal commitment a spiritual union:

Wherefore they are no more twain, but one flesh….(Matt 19:6).

The purpose of marriage as articulated in the Bible is to find true companionship (Gen 2:18; Prov 18:22), produce godly offspring (Mal 2:15; 1 Co 7:14) and fulfill God’s calling upon an individual’s life (Gen 1:28).

It was customary in ancient Israel for parents to arrange a marriage (Gen 24:47-53; 38:6; 1 Sam 18:17), although marrying for love was not uncommon (Jdg 14:2). Arranged marriages highlight the nature of the marriage covenant as a commitment intended to outlast youthful infatuation.

The declaration at the first marriage:

“And Adam said, This is now bone of my bones and flesh of my flesh, she shall be called Woman, because she was taken out of Man.

Therefore shall a man leave his father and his mother and shall cleave unto his wife: and they shall be one flesh (Gen 2:23-24).

Marriage binds husband and wife together into an entity greater than either partner as an individual, and it does so in order to assure continuity of the family lineage.

Marriage within the kinship group was encouraged so as not to alienate family land holdings (Gen 24:4; Num 36:6-9), and in the event that a woman’s husband died and left her childless, the law provided for the husband’s brother to act as a levirate in order to raise up offspring for the deceased (Gen 38:8; Deut 25:5-6).

An engagement period preceded the wedding celebration and the consummation of the marriage union. The pledge of engagement was regarded as being as binding as the marriage itself, and a betrothed woman was considered legally married (Deut 22:23-29).

The engagement was concluded by the payment of a bride-price to the woman’s father (Gen 29:18; Jdg 1:12). This may be understood as a compensation given to the family for the loss of their daughter.

The father enjoyed its usage temporarily, but the money reverted to the daughter at the father’s death or in the event she were widowed. In addition, gifts were given to the bride and her family at the acceptance of a marriage proposal (Gen 24:53).

Thus, marriage and its attendant economic investment brought the bride and groom’s families into legal relationship with one another (Gen 31:50).

Marriage negotiation

Marriage negotiation

Israelite law included a provision for divorce—initiated by the husband only. Marriages were dissolved contractually with a certificate of divorce (Deut 24:1). This divorce document most likely recorded a formula of repudiation declared orally before witnesses:

…for she is not my wife, neither am I her husband (Hos 2:2).

The declaration might have been accompanied by a sign, the act of removing the woman’s outer garment as an annulment of the promise made at the time of the wedding to protect and provide for her (Ruth 3:9; Eze 16:8,37; Hos 2:3,9).

A man was not permitted to divorce his wife if he had forcefully violated her while she was yet unbetrothed (Deut 22:28-29) or if he had falsely accused her of non-virgin status at the time they had wed (Deut 22:13:19).


This is the last chapter of the Old Testament.

When we look at life today and compare it to the life of  Ancient Man we are somewhat amazed at times.  We are unable to duplicate all the things that they did, such as the Great Pyramids.

Supposedly, in 1596, the first flushing toilet was invented and built for Queen Elizabeth I.  Yet, in the 6th century B.C. the city of Pompeii (to speak of one place) had toilets and running water.

In regards to computers, the first graphical operating system was invented in 1985, the first Windows computer was in 1992, but the first Antikythera computer was in 150-100 B.C.

Tomorrow we will look and see what happened in…

Malachi 4
The Coming Day of the Lord

1 For, behold, the day cometh, that shall burn as an oven; and all the proud, yea, and all that do wickedly, shall be stubble: and the day that cometh shall burn them up, saith the LORD of hosts, that it shall leave them neither root nor branch.

Behold, the day of the LORD cometh, and thy spoil shall be divided in the midst of thee. For I will gather all nations against Jerusalem to battle; and the city shall be taken, and the houses rifled, and the women ravished; and half of the city shall go forth into captivity, and the residue of the people shall not be cut off from the city. Then shall the LORD go forth, and fight against those nations, as when he fought in the day of battle. And his feet shall stand in that day upon the mount of Olives, which is before Jerusalem on the east, and the mount of Olives shall cleave in the midst thereof toward the east and toward the west, and there shall be a very great valley; and half of the mountain shall remove toward the north, and half of it toward the south. And ye shall flee to the valley of the mountains; for the valley of the mountains shall reach unto Azal: yea, ye shall flee, like as ye fled from before the earthquake in the days of Uzziah king of Judah: and the LORD my God shall come, and all the saints with thee. And it shall come to pass in that day, that the light shall not be clear, nor dark: But it shall be one day which shall be known to the LORD, not day, nor night: but it shall come to pass, that at evening time it shall be light. And it shall be in that day, that living waters shall go out from Jerusalem; half of them toward the former sea, and half of them toward the hinder sea: in summer and in winter shall it be. And the LORD shall be king over all the earth: in that day shall there be one LORD, and his name one (Zech 14:1-9). _____  And the seventh angel sounded; and there were great voices in heaven, saying, The kingdoms of this world are become the kingdoms of our Lord, and of his Christ; and he shall reign forever and ever.(Rev 11:15).

Behold, the day of the LORD cometh, and thy spoil shall be divided in the midst of thee.
For I will gather all nations against Jerusalem to battle; and the city shall be taken, and the houses rifled, and the women ravished; and half of the city shall go forth into captivity, and the residue of the people shall not be cut off from the city.
Then shall the LORD go forth, and fight against those nations, as when he fought in the day of battle.
And his feet shall stand in that day upon the mount of Olives, which is before Jerusalem on the east, and the mount of Olives shall cleave in the midst thereof toward the east and toward the west, and there shall be a very great valley; and half of the mountain shall remove toward the north, and half of it toward the south.
And ye shall flee to the valley of the mountains; for the valley of the mountains shall reach unto Azal: yea, ye shall flee, like as ye fled from before the earthquake in the days of Uzziah king of Judah: and the LORD my God shall come, and all the saints with thee.
And it shall come to pass in that day, that the light shall not be clear, nor dark:
But it shall be one day which shall be known to the LORD, not day, nor night: but it shall come to pass, that at evening time it shall be light.
And it shall be in that day, that living waters shall go out from Jerusalem; half of them toward the former sea, and half of them toward the hinder sea: in summer and in winter shall it be.
And the LORD shall be king over all the earth: in that day shall there be one LORD, and his name one (Zech 14:1-9).
_____
And the seventh angel sounded; and there were great voices in heaven, saying, The kingdoms of this world are become the kingdoms of our Lord, and of his Christ; and he shall reign forever and ever (Rev 11:15).

2 But unto you that fear my name shall the Sun of righteousness arise with healing in his wings; and ye shall go forth, and grow up as calves of the stall.

3 And ye shall tread down the wicked; for they shall be ashes under the soles of your feet in the day that I shall do this, saith the LORD of hosts.

4 Remember ye the law of Moses my servant, which I commanded unto him in Horeb for all Israel, with the statutes and judgments.

5 Behold, I will send you Elijah the prophet before the coming of the great and dreadful day of the LORD:

“Elijah” – As Elijah came before Elisha (whose ministry was one of judgment and redemption), so “Elijah” will be sent to prepare God’s people for the Lord’s coming.  John the Baptist ministered “in the spirit and power of Elias” (Lk 1:17).  And some feel that Elijah may also be one of the two witnesses in Rev 11:3.

6 And he shall turn the heart of the fathers to the children, and the heart of the children to their fathers, lest I come and smite the earth with a curse.


those 400 years between the books of Malachi and Matthew? 


The Mount of Olives and Malachi 3 – The Sins of the People

April 20, 2014

The words in Black and Maroon is the text from historical/archaeological facts or the numbered scriptures from the Bible.   Words in Blue are God - Red is Jesus – Green is Jerry. Jerry is not a scholar, but a very curious 12 year old boy who loves Jesus and likes to research. If you have any questions you would like to be answered privately or any subject you would like posted please contact me here.

The Mount of Olives or Mount Olivet is a mountain ridge east of and adjacent to the Jerusalem's Old City. It is named for the olive groves that once covered its slopes. The southern part of the Mount was the necropolis of the ancient Judean kingdom. The Mount of Olives (or Mount Olivet, Arabic: جبل الزيتون, الطور, Jebel az-Zeitun; Hebrew: הר הזיתים, Har HaZeitim) is a mountain in East Jerusalem. It is located to next to the Old City, and is part of the West Bank. It is named for the olive groves that once grew on its slopes. The mountain is important to Jews, Muslims and Christians. There are many churches, and the largest Jewish cemetery in the world is located there. The mountain is 809 metres (2,654 ft) above the sea level.

The Mount of Olives or Mount Olivet is a mountain ridge east of and adjacent to the Jerusalem’s Old City. It is named for the olive groves that once covered its slopes. The southern part of the Mount was the necropolis of the ancient Judean kingdom.
The mountain is important to Jews, Muslims and Christians. There are many churches, and the largest Jewish cemetery in the world is located there. The mountain is 2,654 ft)above the sea level.

The Mount of Olives

The Mount of Olives forms a ridge running north and south for about two miles just across the Kidron Valley east of Jerusalem. Zech 14:4 speaks of a split in this mountain that will run from east to west in the eschatological (end times) future.

This gulch will provide an avenue of escape, so the text tells us, when Jerusalem comes under a terrible siege (v. 2).

The Mount of Olives is explicitly mentioned in the Old Testament only here and in 2 Sam 15:30; however, the “hill east of Jerusalem” where Solomon constructed shrines to pagan gods (1 Kgs 11:7-8; cf. 2 Kgs 23:13) was probably the same location.

Galyn examines a tomb cut into the side of the Kidron Valley during Jesus' lifetime.The architectuaral style includes both Egyptian and Greek influence that came from the influence of the kingdoms of the Ptolemies and Seleucids between 300-100 B.C.

Galyn examines a tomb cut into the side of the Kidron Valley during Jesus’ lifetime.The architectuaral style includes both Egyptian and Greek influence that came from the influence
of the kingdoms of the Ptolemies and Seleucids between 300-100 B.C.

In these Old Testament references there seems to be some association of the Mount of Olives with crisis and judgment. This trend continues in the New Testament, where the Mount of Olives is prominent in the ministry of Jesus:

When Jesus in his triumphal entry approached Jerusalem, moving downward from the Mount of Olives, he wept over the city’s coming destruction (Lk 19:30-44).

The cursing of the fig tree (Matt 21:17-19), a symbol of judgment on Israel, appears to have occurred there.

From this vantage point Jesus delivered his “Olivet Discourse” (Matt 24; Mk 13), a prophecy of judgment.

Jesus’ agony in the garden of Gethsemane (Matt 26:30-42), as well as Judas’s betrayal of him (Jn 18:1-3), both occurred there.

God made man and woman to be a couple, to marry (Gen 2:23-24).  God doesn’t like divorce, but He allowed it in Moses’ time (Deut 24).   And since God doesn’t change, He still allows divorce, but He added an amendment to it (Matt  19:3-9).

Tomorrow we’ll look at…

Malachi 3 The Sins of the People

1 Behold, I will send my messenger, and he shall prepare the way before me: and the Lord, whom ye seek, shall suddenly come to his temple, even the messenger of the covenant, whom ye delight in: behold, he shall come, saith the LORD of hosts.

Looking over the Kidron Valley at the Mount of Olives from the David's palace. The southeast corner of the Temple Mount is to the top at the left.

Looking over the Kidron Valley at the Mount of Olives from the David’s palace. The southeast corner of the Temple Mount is to the top at the left.

2 But who may abide the day of his coming? and who shall stand when he appeareth? for he is like a refiner’s fire, and like fullers’ sope:

“Day of his coming” – the day of the Lord.  Malachi announces the Lord’s coming to complete God’s work in history, especially the work he outlines in the rest of his book.  His word is fulfilled in the accomplishments of the Messiah.

3 And he shall sit as a refiner and purifier of silver: and he shall purify the sons of Levi, and purge them as gold and silver, that they may offer unto the LORD an offering in righteousness.

4 Then shall the offering of Judah and Jerusalem be pleasant unto the LORD, as in the days of old, and as in former years.

5 And I will come near to you to judgment; and I will be a swift witness against the sorcerers, and against the adulterers, and against false swearers, and against those that oppress the hireling in his wages, the widow, and the fatherless, and that turn aside the stranger from his right, and fear not me, saith the LORD of hosts.

6 For I am the LORD, I change not; therefore ye sons of Jacob are not consumed.

Standing at the base of the southeast corner of the Temple Mount wall looking down into the Kidron Valley.

Standing at the base of the southeast corner of the Temple Mount wall looking down into the Kidron Valley.

“I change not” – contrary to what many in Malachi’s day were thinking, God remains faithful to His covenant.  The way God is today is the way He has always been, nothing changes Him because He is in control of everything.  When He makes a change it isn’t within Himself, but within or around us.

7 Even from the days of your fathers ye are gone away from mine ordinances, and have not kept them. Return unto me, and I will return unto you, saith the LORD of hosts. But ye said, Wherein shall we return?

8 Will a man rob God? Yet ye have robbed me. But ye say, Wherein have we robbed thee? In tithes and offerings.

9 Ye are cursed with a curse: for ye have robbed me, even this whole nation.

10 Bring ye all the tithes into the storehouse, that there may be meat in mine house, and prove me now herewith, saith the LORD of hosts, if I will not open you the windows of heaven, and pour you out a blessing, that there shall not be room enough to receive it.

“Storehouse” –the treasury rooms of the sanctuary.  In the ancient world there were no banks.  Temples were places where wealth was stored.

Looking south down into the Kidron Valley into the city of Silwan. The ancient City of David (Jerusalem of 1000 BC) is to the right (west) of the Kidron Valley. This photo is taken from David's Palace. It is easy to understand why the Jebusites felt secure as they looked down into this valley at King David and General Joab to shout, "You will never take this city."

Looking south down into the Kidron Valley into the city of Silwan. The ancient City of David (Jerusalem of 1000 BC) is to the right (west) of the Kidron Valley.
This photo is taken from David’s Palace. It is easy to understand why the Jebusites felt secure as they looked down into this valley at King David and
General Joab to shout, “You will never take this city.”

11 And I will rebuke the devourer for your sakes, and he shall not destroy the fruits of your ground; neither shall your vine cast her fruit before the time in the field, saith the LORD of hosts.

12 And all nations shall call you blessed: for ye shall be a delightsome land, saith the LORD of hosts.

13 Your words have been stout against me, saith the LORD. Yet ye say, What have we spoken so much against thee?

14 Ye have said, It is vain to serve God: and what profit is it that we have kept his ordinance, and that we have walked mournfully before the LORD of hosts?

“It is vain to serve God” – because the redemption they longed for had not yet been realized.  And of course, the redemption for them, for us, is much greater then we can imagine (1 Cor 2:9).

15 And now we call the proud happy; yea, they that work wickedness are set up; yea, they that tempt God are even delivered.

“Proud” – evildoers – those that challenge God.

“Happy” – or “blessed.”  In their unbelief, the Jews call blessed those whom the godly know to be cursed, but it is they who will be called blessed if they repent.

Looking down into the Kidron Valley from the base of the southeast corner of the Temple Mount at 2000 year old tombs cut into the west side of the Mount of Olives.

Looking down into the Kidron Valley from the base of the southeast corner of the Temple Mount at 2000 year old tombs cut into the west side of the Mount of Olives.

16 Then they that feared the LORD spake often one to another: and the LORD hearkened, and heard it, and a book of remembrance was written before him for them that feared the LORD, and that thought upon his name.

“They that feared the LORD” – those who had not given way to doubts and cynicism.

17 And they shall be mine, saith the LORD of hosts, in that day when I make up my jewels; and I will spare them, as a man spareth his own son that serveth him.

18 Then shall ye return, and discern between the righteous and the wicked, between him that serveth God and him that serveth him not.

…marriage and divorce in Ancient Israel.


Jesus Gives Life

April 20, 2014

Jesus Gives Life


Megiddo and Malachi 2 – The Warning to the Priesthood

April 19, 2014

The words in Black and Maroon is the text from historical/archaeological facts or the numbered scriptures from the Bible.  
Words in Blue are God - Red is Jesus – Green is Jerry.
Jerry is not a scholar, but a very curious 12 year old boy who loves Jesus and likes to research.
If you have any questions you would like to be answered privately or any subject you would like posted please contact me here.

Notice that this map of Megiddo is almost identical to the map of Sidon yesterday.

Notice that this map of Megiddo is almost identical to the map of Sidon yesterday.

Megiddo

The city of Megiddo controlled the pass between the Valley of Jezreel and the Sharon plain. Routes that travelled northwest to the Phoenician coast and east to Damascus were also controlled by this city.

Many critical battles took place dl Megiddo, one of the most strategic cities in the region now called Palestine.

Excavation of the round stone altar and sacred area at Megiddo.  Notice the depth of accumulated debris that archaeologists had to dig down to reach the altar.

Excavation of the round stone altar and sacred area at Megiddo.
Notice the depth of accumulated debris that archaeologists had to dig down to reach the altar.

An archaeological excavation of Tell el-Mutesellim during the first decade of the 20th century located the city, including numerous layers of occupation. Megiddo was first inhabited during the Neolithic Age.

The Megiddo of the Early Bronze I period boasted the largest known temp[le in the Levant (Syria-Palestine) for that time period.  Excavation revealed numerous levels of occupation through the Middle Bronze and Late Bronze Ages; some levels indicate periods when the city was prosperous and others when it was impoverished.

During the earlier part of the Late Bronze Age Megiddo was under Egyptian domination, having been captured by Pharaoh Thutmose III in approximately 1479 B.C. Several of the Amarna Letters from the ruler of Megiddo profess loyalty to Egypt.

During the conquest of the Promised Land Megiddo was allotted to the tribe of Manasseh (Josh 17:11).  The king of Megiddo is listed among those defeated by Joshua  (Josh 12:21), but Manasseh could not take the city (Jdg 1:27).

It appears that Megiddo was subsequently a Canaanite city with a Philistine presence.  Apparently David conquered it for Israel.

   The most important factor contributing to the culture and economy of the Jezreel was the numerous travel routes that passed through the region.  The mighty Via Maris highway passed right through the Carmel range at Megiddo pass and then angled between Mount Tabor and the hill of Moreh toward Damascus.  From Megiddo, another important road went east to Beth-shean.  A coastal highway extended northwest to Acre, Tyre, and Sidon.  Those living in the Valley of Jezreel benefited enormously from the resulting trade and travel opportunities.

The most important factor contributing to the culture and economy of the Jezreel was the numerous travel routes that passed through the region. The mighty Via Maris highway passed right through the Carmel range at Megiddo pass and then angled between Mount Tabor and the hill of Moreh toward Damascus. From Megiddo, another important road went east to Beth-shean. A coastal highway extended northwest to Acre, Tyre, and Sidon. Those living in the Valley of Jezreel benefited enormously from the resulting trade and travel opportunities.

An occupation level from the 10th century B.C., the age of Solomon, indicates that city was used as a government administrative center for Israel. This level evidences the same kind of multi-chambered gates and double walls (called casemate walls) found in Hazor and Gezer during the same time period.

On the basis of 1 Kgs 9:15 we can conclude that the style of construction used in these cities was of a sort favored by Solomon’s engineers. Pharaoh Shishak (c. 945-924 B.C.) appears to have destroyed Megiddo during a campaign that included an attack on Judah and Jerusalem.

Megiddo was rebuilt and used again as a military or administrative center during the 9th and 8th centuries B.C.

However, the city once again fell to a foreign power when Tiglath-Pileser III, king of Assyria, conquered it around 733 B.C., after which it was used as an Assyrian administrative center. With the fall of the Assyrian Empire, Megiddo came under the control of Judah.

It was the location of the confrontation between King Josiah and Pharaoh Neco that resulted in Josiah’s death.  In Zech 12:11 “the weeping of Hadad Rimmon in the plain of Megiddo” probably refers to mourning over this calamity.  

During the Persian Age the city was abandoned. A number of remarkable archaeological finds have emerged from Megiddo:

A large, round sacrificial area from an Early Bronze temple complex

The spacious Jezreel Valley spreads out to the north and east from Mount Carmel, providing convenient passage for international travelers in ancient times.  The fertile alluvial soil makes this the country's breadbasket as well.  The Bible speaks of the gathering of armies in this valley at the place of Armageddon.

The spacious Jezreel Valley spreads out to the north and east from Mount Carmel, providing convenient passage for international travelers in ancient times. The fertile alluvial soil makes this the country’s breadbasket as well. The Bible speaks of the gathering of armies in this valley at the place of Armageddon.

A plaque depicting a Hittite king standing beneath a winged sun disk

A fragment of an Akkadian tablet containing a part of the Gilgamesh epic

Ivory carvings of the Egyptian god Bes and of lotus patterns

A painted pitcher, called the “Orpheus Jug,” portraying a lyre player leading a procession of animals

Palace structures dating from the Israelite period (tenth-eighth centuries B.C.) reflecting that the city was for a time a significant Israelite administrative center

A stele from Pharaoh Shishak, confirming that this Egyptian monarch did take the city during the time of Rehoboam

uthmosis III  was short, standing only just over 168 cm (five feet) tall, as his mummy tells us (mummy). Legend presents Tuthmosis as born of peasant race, the son of a slave-woman in the Pharaoh's harem. Thutmosis is also called the Napoleon of ancient Egypt because of his military conquests.

Thuthmosis III was short, standing only just over 168 cm (five feet) tall, as his mummy tells us (mummy). Legend presents Tuthmosis as born of peasant race, the son of a slave-woman in the Pharaoh’s harem. Thutmosis is also called the Napoleon of ancient Egypt because of his military conquests.

A remarkable jasper seal with a roaring lion and the inscription “of Shema, servant of Jeroboam” (i.e., Jeroboam II)

A large building excavated there with three aisles running its length, separated by rows of pillars. (Its function has been debated, with some suggesting a storehouse or barracks, but it was probably a stable for horses from the time of Ahab.)

These finds, from different ages and from across the ancient Near East, attest to the abiding significance of Megiddo.


We have stepped back in time to view two cities that relate to Jesus Christ.  Tomorrow we are going to take a tiny step into the Gospels of the New Testament, we’ll look at…

Malachi 2
The Warning to the Priesthood

1 And now, O ye priests, this commandment is for you.

Damascus is made up of a sizeable Old City, divided into the market area, Muslim area, Christian area and the Jewish area. All three groups are still represented in Damascus, even if the Jewish community now only counts a few thousand. In the centre of the city is Martyrs Square. In the side streets just off the square, there are lots of eateries serving shawarma and falafel and pastry shops serving sweetmeats. The Old city is surrounded by what was once a Roman wall and rebuilt several times over the last 2000 years, the Old City boasts a main thoroughfare, Straight Street which has been here since Graeco-Roman times.

Damascus is made up of a sizeable Old City, divided into the market area, Muslim area, Christian area and the Jewish area. All three groups are still represented in Damascus, even if the Jewish community now only counts a few thousand. In the centre of the city is Martyrs Square. In the side streets just off the square, there are lots of eateries serving shawarma and falafel and pastry shops serving sweetmeats. The Old city is surrounded by what was once a Roman wall and rebuilt several times over the last 2000 years, the Old City boasts a main thoroughfare, Straight Street which has been here since Graeco-Roman times.

2 If ye will not hear, and if ye will not lay it to heart, to give glory unto my name, saith the LORD of hosts, I will even send a curse upon you, and I will curse your blessings: yea, I have cursed them already, because ye do not lay it to heart.

“Curse your blessings” – it was the function of the priests to pronounce God’s blessing on the people, but their blessings will become curses so that their uniquely priestly function will be worse than useless.

3 Behold, I will corrupt your seed, and spread dung upon your faces, even the dung of your solemn feasts; and one shall take you away with it.

“Spread dung upon your faces” – not literally, it means to disgrace extensively.

“Dung of…feasts” – the entrails of an animal that were taken “outside the camp” and burned along with its hide and flesh.  As gruesome as this is to a modern reader, it is simply a case of doing to them as they had done to the Lord.  It is the ancient legal concept of “an eye for an eye.”

4 And ye shall know that I have sent this commandment unto you, that my covenant might be with Levi, saith the LORD of hosts.

5 My covenant was with him of life and peace; and I gave them to him for the fear wherewith he feared me, and was afraid before my name.

6 The law of truth was in his mouth, and iniquity was not found in his lips: he walked with me in peace and equity, and did turn many away from iniquity.

2:6-7 – “The law” – priests were responsible to teach the law of Moses to the people, as the churches of today are responsible to teach the word of Jesus.  Not part of the law/Jesus’ ways, but all of it, the good and bad.  Those that leave anything out or change anything will be punished greatly when Jesus comes back (Rev 22:18-19).

Tell Hazor Tell Hazor is one of the largest, most important biblical sites in the Canaanite and Israelite periods. The bible gave it the title: "the head of all those kingdoms". (Josh 11:10).

Tell Hazor
Tell Hazor is one of the largest, most important biblical sites in the Canaanite and Israelite periods. The bible gave it the title: “the head of all those kingdoms”.
(Josh 11:10).

7 For the priest’s lips should keep knowledge, and they should seek the law at his mouth: for he is the messenger of the LORD of hosts.

8 But ye are departed out of the way; ye have caused many to stumble at the law; ye have corrupted the covenant of Levi, saith the LORD of hosts.

“Corrupted the covenant” – by unfaithful teaching, but also, it seems, by intermarriage with foreigners.

9 Therefore have I also made you contemptible and base before all the people, according as ye have not kept my ways, but have been partial in the law.

10 Have we not all one father? hath not one God created us? why do we deal treacherously every man against his brother, by profaning the covenant of our fathers?

2:10-16 – Malachi rebukes the people – in a passage framed by “deal treacherously.”  Two examples of their sin are specifically mentioned: Marrying pagan women and divorce.

11 Judah hath dealt treacherously, and an abomination is committed in Israel and in Jerusalem; for Judah hath profaned the holiness of the LORD which he loved, and hath married the daughter of a strange god.

“Daughter of a strange god” – a pagan woman.  Such marriages were strictly forbidden in the covenant law because they would lead to apostasy.  This is what Paul was talking about when he said “Be ye not unequally yoked…” (2 Cor 6:14-18).

Gezer (Hebrew: גֶּזֶר) was a Canaanite city-state in the foothills of the Judaean Mountains at the border of the Shfela.[1] Tel Gezer (also Tell el-Jezer), an archaeological site midway between Jerusalem and Tel Aviv, is now an Israeli national park. In the Hebrew Bible, Gezer is associated with Joshua and Solomon. It became a major fortified city in the first half of the 2nd millennium BCE. It was later destroyed by fire and rebuilt. The Amarna letters mention kings of Gezer swearing loyalty to the Egyptian Pharaoh. Its importance was in part because of the strategic position it held at the crossroads of the Via Maris (the "Way of the Sea") and the road to Jerusalem and Jericho, both important trade routes.

Gezer  was a Canaanite city-state in the foothills of the Judaean Mountains at the border of the Shfela. Tel Gezer (also Tell el-Jezer), an archaeological site midway between Jerusalem and Tel Aviv, is now an Israeli national park. In the Hebrew Bible, Gezer is associated with Joshua and Solomon.

12 The LORD will cut off the man that doeth this, the master and the scholar, out of the tabernacles of Jacob, and him that offereth an offering unto the LORD of hosts.

13 And this have ye done again, covering the altar of the LORD with tears, with weeping, and with crying out, insomuch that he regardeth not the offering any more, or receiveth it with good will at your hand.

14 Yet ye say, Wherefore? Because the LORD hath been witness between thee and the wife of thy youth, against whom thou hast dealt treacherously: yet is she thy companion, and the wife of thy covenant.

“Witness…wife of thy covenant” – marriage was a covenant (Prov 2:17; Eze 16:8) and covenants were affirmed before witnesses.

15 And did not he make one? Yet had he the residue of the spirit. And wherefore one? That he might seek a godly seed. Therefore take heed to your spirit, and let none deal treacherously against the wife of his youth.

Although the verse is difficult, it may refer to Abraham, who “married” the foreigner Hagar in order to have a son (Gen 16:1-4).  But Abraham didn’t divorce Sarah, who had suggested the union with Hagar in the first place.

Cultic remains discovered at the site were a row of ten monolithic stone steles, the tallest of which was 3 meters high, and a large, square, stone basin. According to the Bible, Joshua defeated the King of Gezer, but the Tribe of Ephraim did not expel the Canaanite inhabitants and that they lived together with the Israelites. One of the best-known findings is the Gezer calendar. In 1957 Yigael Yadin identified a Solomonic wall and gateway identical in construction to the remains excavated at Megiddo and Hazor.

Cultic remains discovered at the site were a row of ten monolithic stone steles, the tallest of which was 3 meters high, and a large, square, stone basin. According to the Bible, Joshua defeated the King of Gezer, but the Tribe of Ephraim did not expel the Canaanite inhabitants and that they lived together with the Israelites. One of the best-known findings is the Gezer calendar. In 1957 Yigael Yadin identified a Solomonic wall and gateway identical in construction to the remains excavated at Megiddo and Hazor.

16 For the LORD, the God of Israel, saith that he hateth putting away: for one covereth violence with his garment, saith the LORD of hosts: therefore take heed to your spirit that ye deal not treacherously.

17 Ye have wearied the LORD with your words. Yet ye say, Wherein have we wearied him? When ye say, Every one that doeth evil is good in the sight of the LORD, and he delighteth in them; or, Where is the God of judgment?

2:17-4:6 – the second half of Malachi’s prophecy speaks of God’s coming to His people.  They had given up on God and had grown religiously cynical and morally corrupt.  So God’s coming will mean judgment and purification as well as redemption.


…the Mount of Olives.


EASTER

April 19, 2014

40 - Passover vs. Easter


Sidon and Malachi 1 – Fall of Edom Shows God’s Love

April 18, 2014

The words in Black and Maroon is the text from historical/archaeological facts or the numbered scriptures from the Bible.  
Words in Blue are God - Red is Jesus – Green is Jerry.
Jerry is not a scholar, but a very curious 12 year old boy who loves Jesus and likes to research.
If you have any questions you would like to be answered privately or any subject you would like posted please contact me here.

Sidon or Saïda is the third-largest city in Lebanon. It is located in the South Governorate of Lebanon, on the Mediterranean coast, about 25 miles north of Tyre and 25 miles south of the capital Beirut.  In Genesis, Sidon is the son of Canaan the grandson of Noah. Its name coincides with the modern Arabic word for fishery. There are some Important cites in Sidon, such as Nazareth where Jesus Christ grew up, the Sea of Galillee, and Damascus, where on the way Paul was converted by Jesus Christ from heaven.

Sidon or Saïda is the third-largest city in Lebanon. It is located in the South Governorate of Lebanon, on the Mediterranean coast, about 25 miles north of Tyre and 25 miles south of the capital Beirut.
In Genesis, Sidon is the son of Canaan the grandson of Noah. Its name coincides with the modern Arabic word for fishery.
There are some Important cites in Sidon, such as Nazareth where Jesus Christ grew up, the Sea of Galillee, and Damascus, where on the way Paul was converted by Jesus Christ from heaven.

Sidon

Sidon is located at a natural harbor on the coast of Lebanon, in ancient Phoenicia, between Tyre and Beirut.  It was, in fact, one of the oldest and most important cities in the region. Sidon’s prominence is reflected in the fact that it is mentioned in Hittite, Ugaritic, Egyptian and Assyrian records.

The Sidonians were engaged throughout their long history in fishing, seafaring, commerce and the manufacture of purple dye. An enormous mound of murex shells, from which this striking dye was extracted, still exists in modern Sidon.

Sidon Today Sidon was a small fishing town of 10,000 inhabitants in 1900, but studies in 2000 showed a population of 65,000 in the city and around 200,000 in the metropolitan area. The little level land around the city is used for cultivation of some wheat, vegetables, and fruits, especially citrus and bananas. The fishing in the city remains active with a newly opened fishery that sells fresh fish by bidding every morning. The ancient basin is transformed into a fishing port, while a small quay was constructed to receive small commercial vessels.

Sidon Today
Sidon was a small fishing town of 10,000 inhabitants in 1900, but studies in 2000 showed a population of 65,000 in the city and around 200,000 in the metropolitan area. The little level land around the city is used for cultivation of some wheat, vegetables, and fruits, especially citrus and bananas. The fishing in the city remains active with a newly opened fishery that sells fresh fish by bidding every morning. The ancient basin is transformed into a fishing port, while a small quay was constructed to receive small commercial vessels.

Its inhabitants were also known for their fine craftsmanship; they produced beautiful works in materials such as ivory and silver.

References to “Greater Sidon” in Josh 11:8 and 19:28 reflect a precise knowledge of the name of the town.

The Assyrian record of Sennacherib’s campaign in 701 B.C. states that he captured both “Greater Sidon” and “Little Sidon.”

When Joshua divided the Promised Land, Sidon was allotted to the tribe of Asher, but this tribe was unable to drive out the Sido-nians (Jdg 1:31, 3:1-3).

Later, during the divided monarchy period, Ahab married Jezebel, daughter of Ethbaal, king of Sidon, in a union that resulted in the introduction of pagan worship into the northern kingdom (1 Kgs 16:31-33). The prophets Jeremiah (Jer 25:22, 27:3-6, 47:4), Ezekiel (Eze 28:20-24), Joel (Joel 3:4-8) and Zechariah (Zec 9:1-2) all pronounced judgment against Sidon.

Beginning of the attack on Lachish (Assyrian, about 700-692 BC) – This panel shows an important incident during Sennacherib’s campaign of 701 BC, the capture of Lachish in the kingdom of Judah. Here, at the back, long-range artillery are slinging stones and shooting arrows,

Beginning of the attack on Lachish (Assyrian, about 700-692 BC) – This panel shows an important incident during Sennacherib’s campaign of 701 BC, the capture of Lachish in the kingdom of Judah. Here, at the back, long-range artillery are slinging stones and shooting arrows,

She was among the cities God had given to Nebuchadnezzar of Babylon (Jer 27:6), and a text excavated at Babylon lists the king of Sidon among Nebuchadnezzar’s captives. Sidon was also a center for the Persian fleet during the reign of Xerxes.

Excavations at ancient Sidon have been limited by recent military hostilities, as well as by urban development.

Recently there have been indications of the possibility of excavating remains of ancient Sidon under the sea (Greek historians indicate that in 146 B.C. the city was struck by an earthquake, which caused a large portion of it to sink beneath the ocean).


The purple dye mentioned in the article may be the same valuable purple dye used in the New Testament.

Tomorrow we’re going to step back in time with Joshua and King David and once again visit the city of…

Malachi 1
Fall of Edom Shows God’s Love

1 The burden of the word of the LORD to Israel by Malachi.

Jacob Wrestling with the Angel by Eugène Delacroix. Jacob (/ˈdʒeɪkəb/; Hebrew: יַעֲקֹב Standard Yaʿakov, Tiberian  Yaʿăqōḇ (help·info); Septuagint Greek: Ἰακώβ Iakōb; Arabic: يَعْقُوب‎ Yaʿqūb; "heel" or "leg-puller"), also later known as Israel (Hebrew: יִשְׂרָאֵל, Standard Yisraʾel, Tiberian Yiśrāʾēl, "persevere with God";[1] Septuagint Greek: Ἰσραήλ Israēl; Arabic: إِسْرَائِيل‎ Isrāʼīl), as described in the Hebrew Bible, the Talmud, the New Testament, the Qur'an and Baha'i scripture[2] was the third patriarch of the Hebrew people with whom God made a covenant, and ancestor of the tribes of Israel, which were named after his descendants. In the Hebrew Bible, he is the son of Isaac and Rebekah, the grandson of Abraham, Sarah and of Bethuel, and the younger twin brother of Esau. Jacob had twelve sons and at least one daughter, by his two wives, Leah and Rachel, and by their handmaidens Bilhah and Zilpah. The children named in Genesis were Reuben, Simeon, Levi, Judah, Dan, Naphtali, Gad, Asher, Issachar, Zebulun, daughter Dinah, Joseph, and Benjamin.[3][4] Before the birth of Benjamin, Jacob is renamed "Israel" by God (Genesis 32:28-29 and 35:10). Etymologically, the name "Israel" comes from the Hebrew words לִשְׂרות (lisrot, "wrestle") and אֵל (El, "God").[5] Popular English translations typically reference the face off with God, ranging from active "wrestles with God"

Jacob Wrestling with the Angel by Eugène Delacroix.
Jacob, also later known as Israel,  was the third patriarch of the Hebrew people with whom God made a covenant, and ancestor of the tribes of Israel, which were named after his descendants.
Heis the son of Isaac and Rebekah, the grandson of Abraham, Sarah and of Bethuel, and the younger twin brother of Esau. 
Before the birth of Benjamin, Jacob is renamed “Israel” by God (Gen 32:28-29 and 35:10). Etymologically, the name “Israel” comes from the Hebrew words “wrestle” and “God”. 

2 I have loved you, saith the LORD. Yet ye say, Wherein hast thou loved us? Was not Esau Jacob’s brother? saith the LORD: yet I loved Jacob,

3 And I hated Esau, and laid his mountains and his heritage waste for the dragons of the wilderness.

“I hated Esau” – if Israel doubts god’s covenant love, she should consider the contrast between God’s ways with her and His ways with Jacob’s brother Esau (Edom).  Paul explains God’s love for Jacob and hatred for Esau on the basis of election (Rom 9:10-13).

God chose Jacob but not Esau.  “Love” and “hate” are covenant words throughout the ancient Near East.  Clearly then, the idea is that God made a covenant with Jacob but refused to make one with Esau. 

For other possible meanings of “love’ and “hate,” cf. how Leah was “hated” in that Jacob lived Rachel more (Gen 29:31, 33; cf. Deut 21:16-17).

Likewise, believers are to “hate” their parents (Lk 14:26) in the sense that they love Christ even more (Matt 10:37).

“Waste” – Malachi’s words about Edom echo those of the earlier prophets.  Between c. 550 and 400 B.C. the Nabatean Arabs gradually forced the Edomites from their homeland, resulting in the formation of Idumea in New Testament.

4 Whereas Edom saith, We are impoverished, but we will return and build the desolate places; thus saith the LORD of hosts, They shall build, but I will throw down; and they shall call them, The border of wickedness, and, The people against whom the LORD hath indignation forever.

5 And your eyes shall see, and ye shall say, The LORD will be magnified from the border of Israel.

6 A son honored his father, and a servant his master: if then I be a father, where is mine honor? and if I be a master, where is my fear? saith the LORD of hosts unto you, O priests that despise my name. And ye say, Wherein have we despised thy name?

The Book of Genesis contains the story of Jacob and Esau focusing on Esau's sale of his birthright to Jacob and the conflict that had spawned between their descendant nations because of this sale.

The Book of Genesis contains the story of Jacob and Esau focusing on Esau’s sale of his birthright to Jacob and the conflict that had spawned between their descendant nations because of this sale.

7 Ye offer polluted bread upon mine altar; and ye say, Wherein have we polluted thee? In that ye say, The table of the LORD is contemptible.

8 And if ye offer the blind for sacrifice, is it not evil? and if ye offer the lame and sick, is it not evil? offer it now unto thy governor; will he be pleased with thee, or accept thy person? saith the LORD of hosts.

9 And now, I pray you, beseech God that he will be gracious unto us: this hath been by your means: will he regard your persons? saith the LORD of hosts.

10 Who is there even among you that would shut the doors for nought? neither do ye kindle fire on mine altar for nought. I have no pleasure in you, saith the LORD of hosts, neither will I accept an offering at your hand.

11 For from the rising of the sun even unto the going down of the same my name shall be great among the Gentiles; and in every place incense shall be offered unto my name, and a pure offering: for my name shall be great among the heathen, saith the LORD of hosts.

“Rising of the sun” –Malachi brackets his book with this metaphor, as it is a common Old Testament phrase that usually means, “For the LORD God is a sun and shield.”

The Nabataeans, also Nabateans (Arabic: الأنباط‎ al-ʾAnbāṭ), were an ancient people who inhabited the Southern Levant, their settlements in CE 37 – c. 100, gave the name of Nabatene to the borderland between Arabia and Syria, from the Euphrates to the Red Sea.

The Nabataeans, also Nabateans  were an ancient people who inhabited the Southern Levant, their settlements in CE 37 – c. 100, gave the name of Nabatene to the borderland between Arabia and Syria, from the Euphrates to the Red Sea.

12 But ye have profaned it, in that ye say, The table of the LORD is polluted; and the fruit thereof, even his meat, is contemptible.

13 Ye said also, Behold, what a weariness is it! and ye have snuffed at it, saith the LORD of hosts; and ye brought that which was torn, and the lame, and the sick; thus ye brought an offering: should I accept this of your hand? saith the LORD.

14 But cursed be the deceiver, which hath in his flock a male, and voweth, and sacrificeth unto the Lord a corrupt thing: for I am a great King, saith the LORD of hosts, and my name is dreadful among the heathen.


…Megiddo.


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